Fear

(A chapter in YOU HAVE UPSET THE BALANCE OF THE UNIVERSE BY BEING BORN: Advice on How to Live by Dr Robert MacLean, PhD: http://robertmaclean.blogspot.com/p/you-have-upset-balance-of-universe-by.html. A new chapter every so often.)
    
    You are a swashbuckler.  You live beyond your means, both financially and psychologically.  You live dangerously, which is to say naked and unashamed.  Play and danger are what you need.  There is no security anyway and heaven loves those who dare.
    Fear is a bore (see BOREDOM).
    And what is guilt but fear of punishment?  Also boring.  Surrender to the air and ride on it.  If there is a cosmic bureaucrat monitoring your behavior (see GOD), give him a good show.  Sell it, baby!  Be selfish.  Be a monster.  Sin, as Martin Luther said, bravely.  You have an obligation to indulge yourself.  Once you start going for safety it never stops, it's like money.  Never enough.  Go without assurance.  Safety is vulgar.
    Taking this attitude towards fear--an attitude of disdain--gives the right relation.  Fear is ignoble.  You are noble.
    You are more than noble.  You are divine.  Fear is forgetting that one is divine.  What can possibly happen to you?
    But here is the paradox: anything can happen to you, because divinity is vulnerability.  Insofar as you are divine, that far are you vulnerable.
    Which leads to a seduction: if you make yourself tall enough you'll fly, fine, but do you want to fly?  To get high, to experience joy always can only be desirable (see JOY), and yet you find yourself yearning for a vision with a little blood in it, even if it's your own.
    The analogy is to religion.  On each of the several continents the vast majority of sentient adults are apparently bores committed to some form of religious practice or metaphysical speculation; whereas if they really believed in their eternal natures as you do it might occur to them that eternity is adequate for the contemplation of the eternal.  We have made a privileged intrusion into time.  It is the moment for things of the earth.  If they're not to your taste you'll just have to wait for the bus back.
    So it is with your fear.  You cling to it not perhaps because you are afraid but because you find it cozy, like gray weather (see WEATHER).  You suspect that it may be the price of sensitivity (see MANNERS).  Uncertainty and ambiguity are the stuff of life.  How can they be relished without fear?  Your very sensuality requires that you feel fear.  There can be no shiver of anticipation without it.
    Make yourself tall enough and you'll fly, yes, but make yourself small enough and you'll get by.  Humility is comelier than pride.  If you are of a higher race it is the condition of your moment here that you forget that.
    Fear, that is, is luxury.  An indulgence.  If it makes you feel better, go ahead.
    (See also MORALITY).

You Need Money to Be Rich

Nobody ever met cuter: a romantic thriller about stealing with style.
Reg’d © Library of Congress
She's tough; he's refined.
She's practical; he's cultured.
She's brilliant; he's elegant.
She's serious; he's frivolous.
She's a lawyer; he's a crook.
She never loses; neither does he.
Daring British barrister Francesca Smithson, the darling of the press for her courtroom tactics, is appointed to defend American CFO Hugo Danch at hearings to extradite him to New York for absconding with a fortune from his crashing company Engone.

Proposed cast: Reese Witherspoon (Francesca)
But at the hotel there's a mix-up—she's sent to the suite of Romeo Balue, a light-hearted charmer who mistakes her for the call girl he'd ordered—

Proposed cast: Javier Bardem (Romeo)
and, what is it, her spirit of fun? she is in a rut—she plays along!
Soon she's leading a double life—by night Romeo's bird of paradise, by day the defender of a man with a briefcase full of bearer bonds.

Proposed cast: Tim Robbins (Hugo)
To avoid arrest Hugo allows her to take charge of the bonds—but then Romeo disappears with them! Who's been conning who?
Turns out he's a retired art thief, whose mistress Ada Hauptmeier has seen paintings at the Royal Academy of Arts that the Nazis confiscated from her family, and are now in the hands of the Russian government, where they're being pilfered away. She doesn't want Romeo to do anything bad, but he's looking into it. 

Proposed cast: Anamaria Marinca (Ada) 
And why not scoop the bonds at the same time? 
What's Francesca to do? All right, she was bored with her fiancé, Jason—

Proposed cast: Steve Pemberton (Jason)
—but Romeo has disappeared with the bonds, and a truck full of paintings, left her on the hook with some murderous people...and the game heats up.
Set in London—

—and Lake Como
—this—
plus this—
equals this:           





Pretentious Pictures presents a romantic thriller.
Reg’d © Library of Congress

The Trial of Don Juan

                 A Comedy of Passions
                                                          Reg’d © Library of Congress
The modern Don Juan is a woman in disguise—both a womanizer and a manizer, and active in both fields. Famous, indeed legendary, she wears high boots, a flowing white shirt and a stylish little mustache, as if she’d just stepped out of the 17th century—everything but the sword. She climbs balconies, changes lovers as fast as if she were dancing and displays her sharp and wounding wit (in a way she does carry a sword) whenever it can win her a conquest.
Trouble is, she likes to gamble, and isn’t nearly as lucky at cards as she is at love. She loses fortunes, and is obliged to marry—in her role as a man. But her wife, and then a wife she steals, die, and those who had stood to inherit believe she murdered them.
She’s been indicted, she’s a fugitive from justice, and now she’s making a video about what really happened—her testimony to the judge whom she dare not face in person. Her adventures take her from Seville to Switzerland to Turkey to a Greek island to Rio de Janeiro (so versatile are the locations to be had in Athens)—
—because not only is she a Don Juan out of Byron and Mozart, she is an Angelique, thrust everywhere by life, always generous, always gorgeous, always victorious—
—well, at least until she meets Celeste (Skyrah Archerreel), and encounters in her an aristocracy of feeling that compels in Don Juan the love she usually commands from others. And Celeste loves her—as a man. What happens when she finds out Don Juan is a woman?
Leporello (Duncan Skinnerreel), Don Juan's servant and foil, misses no chance to contradict, insult or belittle "him"—"Indeed, sir"—though they have an affectionate bond.
Rich widow Pucci Winkleman (Laura Mamakos) and the Don fall in love and marry. When she finds out he's a woman she conspires with him to keep it a secret—
—even from her sister-in-law Philistia (MariaCristina Heller, reel) And when Pucci accidentally falls from a high place, and Philistia doesn't inherit, she begins an obsessive quest for revenge.
Livingston Bartlet (Fiona Georgiadireel)  rescues the Don from a gambling fiasco, and the Don rescues her from a husband she can't bear. When she is hit by a train—
—Wade Barlet (Tom Malloyreel) joins Philistia in her campaign to prevent Don Juan from enjoying their money.
While gambling with some of it the Don is drugged and kidnapped by an Emirate sultan (Joe E. Legendreel) and taken to a house on the Turkish coast—
—where she is caught in the bath with—
—the Sultan's seventh wife (Nefeli Kourireel). She escapes (Don Juan, that is), abandons herself to the sea and swims to Chios, where she emerges nude before—
—the unbearably proper Roger Humphrey (Ian Robertsonreel), who falls in love. Relieved by Don Juan's facility with disguise, he takes "her" home—
—where his wife Thomasina (Alice Triarchis) falls in love with "him." He is on the point of escaping when in walks Celeste, whom he had loved at first sight in Seville years earlier, with her domineering husband—
—Bloke Bletherington (Adrian Frielingreel), a Blackwater type with worldwide connections. When he takes "her" to Rio and drowns by accident—
—Don Juan is on the run.
The music, performed by Athens guitarist Mentor Soula, includes Historia de un Amor, and selections from The Barber of SevilleDon Giovanni and Isaac Albéniz’s Sevilla
Pretentious Pictures presents The Trial of Don Juan, A Comedy of Passions
                                                         Reg’d © Library of Congress

You Need Money to Be Rich

Nobody ever met cuter: a romantic thriller about stealing with style.
Reg’d © Library of Congress
She's tough; he's refined.
She's practical; he's cultured.
She's brilliant; he's elegant.
She's serious; he's frivolous.
She's a lawyer; he's a crook.
She never loses; neither does he.
Daring British barrister Francesca Smithson, the darling of the press for her courtroom tactics, is appointed to defend American CFO Hugo Danch at hearings to extradite him to New York for absconding with a fortune from his crashing company Engone.

Proposed cast: Zoe Saldana (Francesca)
But at the hotel there's a mix-up—she's sent to the suite of Romeo Balue, a light-hearted charmer who mistakes her for the call girl he'd ordered—

Proposed cast: Javier Bardem (Romeo)
and, what is it, her spirit of fun? she is in a rut—she plays along!
Soon she's leading a double life—by night Romeo's bird of paradise, by day the defender of a man with a briefcase full of bearer bonds.

Proposed cast: Tim Robbins (Hugo)
To avoid arrest Hugo allows her to take charge of the bonds—but then Romeo disappears with them! Who's been conning who?
Turns out he's a retired art thief, whose mistress Ada Hauptmeier has seen paintings at the Royal Academy of Arts that the Nazis confiscated from her family, and are now in the hands of the Russian government, where they're being pilfered away. She doesn't want Romeo to do anything bad, but he's looking into it. 

Proposed cast: Anamaria Marinca (Ada) 
And why not scoop the bonds at the same time? 
What's Francesca to do? All right, she was bored with her fiancé, Jason—

Proposed cast: Steve Pemberton (Jason)
—but Romeo has disappeared with the bonds, and a truck full of paintings, left her on the hook with some murderous people...and the game heats up.
Set in London—

—and Lake Como
—this—
plus this—
equals this:           

Pretentious Pictures presents a romantic thriller.
Reg’d © Library of Congress